Touring Bora Bora…

You’d think there isn’t much to see on such a small island. To be honest, with only a single road running along the perimeter, you wouldn’t be far off. Having said that, there are some things worth checking out. So we spent a morning on a tour.

We started off in a small village. It had one of 3 churches on Bora Bora (2 Protestant, 1 Catholic) and one of the few primary schools.

BB16-8418

BB16-8417

Interesting side note: they only have up to the equivalent of our middle school on the island (of which there’s only one). For high school, the kids have to take a ferry over to Raiatea. That’s a 2.5 hour trip each way. Suffice it to say, they go for an entire week and come home for weekends. On top of that, parents have to pay for both the ferry and for school: they’re not free, and not cheap.

After some more touring around the island, our guide took us to some relics from World War II. The US Army and Navy built the first air field in French Polynesia on Bora Bora during the war. It’s still in use today. They all installed 4 large gunnery emplacements, 2 each for the cardinal directions, along with bunkers for support.

BB16-8446

BB16-8447

BB16-8450

BB16-8452

BB16-8451

The guns were never fired in anger, apparently.

After that, we finished our circle around the island. Along the way, we passed some bungalows that, apparently, Marlon Brando lived in for a time. At the end of our tour, our guide dropped Steph and I off at the main town on Bora Bora, Vaitape. We decided to have some lunch at a small cafe with a decent view.

BB16-8465

Following our lunch, we did a little shopping. We of course had to drop in and see some of the famed Tahitian pearls.

BB16-8470

Once done with wandering Vaitape, it was back to the harbor to catch our boat. While out, we had met a gentleman from the UK who was sailing the Pacific on a “working boat”. This was his ride, as we came to find out.

BB16-8475

Not a bad gig, I suppose. Just not sure I’d pay to go on a “working vacation”, but hey…

This entry was posted in Travel. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *